Tag Archives: market view

Stocks in Focus: Prudential Plc

This week I am looking at Prudential, the multinational life insurance and financial services company.  Prudential has had a strong year after economic conditions turned in its favour, reporting a new business profit increase of 17 per cent for the year to September 30. The third quarter trading update also reassured investors that there are still clear structural opportunities in each of its three key markets – Asia, the US and the UK.

Much of the rise in the new business profit has come from the Asian market. This growth is expected to continue to drive the share price going forward. Management are hopeful that the Asian business will double in size every five to seven years thanks to a growing and increasingly affluent Asian middle class that has driven demand and sales.

Elsewhere, the company intends to strengthen its position in the UK asset management market, targeting the retirement income needs of an aging UK population, following its merger with M&G asset management. Prudential also own one of the largest life insurance providers in the US, Jackson National, and expect this area to perform well given the demographic shift of Baby-Boomers moving into retirement.

The Asian business now accounts for over a third of group profits but faces strong competition, with companies such as AIA having a much greater presence in China. Other concerns include how a weakening of the US Macro backdrop could impact the US business, and whether an excessive rise in UK interest rates could threaten the UK annuity business. While the company appears to be well-poised for further growth, these threats are significant.

https://www.nwbrown.co.uk/news/company-report-library/

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Stocks in Focus: RBS Group Plc

Following the UK budget last week, Philip Hammond, the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced plans to begin selling the government’s remaining 71 per cent stake in The Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) towards the end of 2018. It is his intention that the FTSE 100 bank will once again become entirely privatised. At the height of the financial crisis, RBS had no choice but to accept a £45bn government bail-out on the back of the largest annual loss in UK corporate history.

On previous occasions, the Chancellor has avoided setting a deadline until RBS had reached an agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ) over a multi-billion dollar fine for miss-selling mortgage-backed securities in the lead-up to the 2008 financial crisis.

Unsurprisingly, the announcement came shortly after a good set of third quarter results, which demonstrated a broadly reassuring outlook for RBS. Following several years at a loss, RBS posted a net profit of £392m for the quarter, which was largely attributed to lower costs and significantly lower restructuring and litigation charges compared to 2016. More importantly, a number of legacy issues it has faced since the crisis appear to be coming to a close including the DoJ fine which the Bank expects to settle in the coming months although it is still unclear what the final bill may be.

It is promising to see that the business appears to be on track to achieve its 2018 targets and hopefully see its first full year of net profit since the bail-out. If its recovery continues, investors should eventually look forward to a reinstated dividend. However, RBS still faces a number of risks given that it is significantly geared towards the UK in the face of Brexit and there are still other litigation cases yet to be settled.

https://www.nwbrown.co.uk/news/company-report-library/

Stocks in Focus: Vodafone

This week I am looking at telecommunications giant Vodafone, which recently published its half-year results. For the past couple of years the company has been facing tough competition in Europe and losing market share in Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK. Furthermore, Vodafone had to write-down £4.3 billion earlier this year in India, its most promising growth market, when competition intensified with the introduction of a new mobile carrier that offered six months free service to customers.

However, these concerns seem to be easing as Vodafone surprised investors last week by raising its annual profit forecast. The revised outlook is the result of a stronger than expected start to the year with notable improvements in operating profit, service revenue and cash flow. European operations have performed well with strong performances in Spain and Italy. The group also announced that the merger of its Indian operations with former local rival, Idea Cellular, is progressing well, which gives hope that the combined business can recover in the near future. Management has raised its guidance for full-year profit growth to around 10% from 4%-8% and the interim dividend was increased, which reflects a growing confidence in the future positive performance of the group.

Several undertakings led to these encouraging results, namely improvements in the quality of products and services, investment in networks, cost cutting measures and the merger of underperforming operations. Nonetheless, the cost of delivering these enhancements, including spending on infrastructure and mobile spectrum, is enormous. Investors should not neglect the importance of sustainable revenue and strong cash flow generation when evaluating companies.

https://www.nwbrown.co.uk/news/company-report-library/

NW Brown September 2017 Market Review

This edition of the Market Review considers whether markets will continue to climb a “wall of worry”.

September 2017 Market Review

Points of View: Insurance

This week I have been looking at the unfolding 2017 hurricane season and the effects that Harvey, Irma and Maria could have on the US economy and the broader insurance sector.  These events have caused devastation across the Caribbean, Texas and Florida.  The financial impact that they will have is difficult to judge this early on.  However, total losses are expected to be between $80 and $125 billion.  Over the short term there will be a negative impact to the US economy. US jobs data has already shown that the number of jobs created by the economy has contracted for the first time since 2010 and the hurricanes have been seen as a large contributor. However, economic activity is expected to return as insurance policies pay out, property is rebuilt and damaged items such as cars are replaced.

Closer to home the impact will be felt by Lloyd’s Insurers, the London based, global insurance market. They have estimated that Harvey and Irma will cause around $4.5bn in losses to their members.  This is expected to lead to an underwriting loss for the year but CEO, Inga Beale, has stated that this is to be expected in such events and that “this is what we are here for”.

Natural disasters are both good and bad for those insurers covering this market. On one hand, they will suffer some large capital pay-outs in the short term. On the other hand, such events inevitably help push future premiums up. This is especially relevant at the moment given that the lack of disasters in recent years has driven premiums down to a level that has caused problems in the market.

 

https://www.nwbrown.co.uk/news/company-report-library/

Stocks in Focus: GlaxoSmithKline

I am once again looking at GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) following the announcement of its first set of results since the appointment of Emma Walmsley as Chief Executive. Ms Walmsley has been with GSK for seven years, having previously worked at L’Oreal in a variety of marketing and management roles. With Pharmaceuticals being the core of GSK’s business, it is unusual to have a CEO whose experience lies outside the core division – although the ability to review the division from a fresh perspective could well be advantageous.

The second quarter results were slightly ahead of consensus, giving Ms Walmsley a solid start to her tenure. Alongside the results she set out her key objectives for the first time, highlighting the need to prioritise improvement of the core Pharmaceutical division. In short, GSK needs to become better at developing and commercialising lucrative drugs. Despite launching high volumes of new drugs, the company has not seen many of these lead to huge sales. Indeed, GSK’s last “blockbuster” product release was the asthma treatment, Advair, which at its 2013 peak made up one-fifth of the group’s revenues.

Ms Walmsley therefore plans to strengthen the pipeline by a) increasing the amount spent on research & development, and b) channelling 80% of this spend on a narrower set of four therapy areas (Respiratory, HIV, Immuno-inflammatory and Oncology). She also plans to bring about a more dynamic/accountable commercial model to help the business make the most of its innovations.

With an enthusiastic, fresh CEO at the helm and a credible plan in place to increase productivity over the long term, GSK looks well set. However, it is fair to say that previous attempts to increase productivity and commercial success have not been entirely successful – and investors may therefore want to wait for some evidence of success before buying into Ms Walmsley’s vision.

https://www.nwbrown.co.uk/news/company-report-library/ 

Stocks in Focus: McColl’s

 

This week I am looking at McColl’s following the announcement of its interim results on Monday 24 July.  McColl’s is a leading neighbourhood retailer with 1,650 stores across the UK and the results mark one year since it announced the acquisition of 298 convenience stores from the Co-Op; a deal that has accelerated its shift away from being a traditional newsagent towards being a full-blooded convenience store retailer.

On the plus side, results show that like-for-like sales were up 0.2% for the first half of the year and 1.4% in the second quarter – a good result considering that like-for-like sales had hitherto been in negative territory for an extended period.  The Chief Executive, Jonathan Miller, highlighted McColl’s focus on the relatively robust convenience market and the IGD forecasts that the UK convenience market will grow by 12% between 2016 and 2021.  McColl’s hopes to benefit from this growth while continuing to grow its footprint and improve its in-store offering through better product ranges and the addition of more services (such as post offices and online shopping collection points that help drive customer footfall). On the downside, the food retail market remains very competitive and larger supermarkets also remain focussed on improving their convenience store offering. This competitive market may at some point drive negative like-for-like sales again, which can in turn hurt margins.

At the current valuation the shares do not look expensive and successful integration of the Co-Op stores should deliver attractive earnings growth.  However, the increased debt as a result of the store purchases does leave the company more vulnerable in the short term should the UK economy suffer a downturn.

https://www.nwbrown.co.uk/news/company-report-library/